Intensifiers/modifiers, It as preparatory subject, It as preparatory object

Intensifiers/modifiers

The meaning of many adjectives can be intensified with adverbs such as rather, very or exceedingly.

– It was rather hot in the room.
– It only had a very short time to prepare for the test.
– It was exceedingly difficult to cross the road.

Some adjectives already have an ‘extreme’ meaning. These adjectives can only be further intensified with adverbs such as absolutely, completely or utterly.

– The plot of that film was completely impossible.
– She was utterly miserable when the holiday ended.

Intensifiers/modifiers, It as preparatory subject, It as preparatory object

It as preparatory subject

It can be used as the subject of a sentence referring forwards to a word or phrase occurring later. This is a common structure in spoken English. It is often used:

to precede an infinitive clause

It was really lovely to see Philip again.
It makes me sad to see her so frail and thin.

to precede a wh- clause (with that/who/what, etc.)

It’s unlikely that he’ll arrive on time.
It’s terrible how many people are unemployed.

to give additional emphasis to the first piece of information in a sentence

It was Sally who gave me the present, not Ann.

It as preparatory object

It can also be used as the object of a sentence, referring forwards to a word or phrase occurring later, in this pattern: subject + verb + it + complement + infinitive/wh-clause.

– They thought it undesirable to give him the prize.
– I found it puzzling that she’d not said goodbye.


Intensifiers/modifiers, It as preparatory subject, It as preparatory object publicat: 2019-02-15T09:56:29+03:00, actualizat: 2019-02-15T10:44:12+03:00 by Colegiu.info