Conditionals (Formal style, If + should/happen to, Supposing/imagine, If + was/were to, If + will/would)

Conditionals

Formal style

In more formal styles, if can be omitted and the auxiliary verb placed before the subject.

If I had been warned → Had I been warned about the situation, I would have made other arrangements.
If they had not been ordered to → Had they not been ordered to, they would never have entered the building.

If + should/happen to

We use if + should/happen to to suggest that something is rather unlikely to happen, or may just happen by chance.

Should and happen can be used togheter.

If you (should) happen to pass a pharmacy, could you get me some aspirin?

Conditionals (Formal style, If + should/happen to, Supposing/imagine, If + was/were to, If + will/would)

Supposing/imagine

We use supposing and imagine in place of if. The meaning is similar.

Supposing/Imagine you won the lottery – what would you do with the money?

If + was/were to

We use if + was/were to to make an event seem more hypothetical. This structure is not used, e.g. believe.

If they were to find a way of wiping out malaria, milions of lives would be saved.

If + will/would

We use if + will/would to make requests more polite. In this case the auxiliary will/would means ‘be willing to’.

If you will just bear with us for a few moments, the Minister will answer your questions.
If you would be kind enough to send your accounts details, we will settle this matter immediately.


Conditionals (Formal style, If + should/happen to, Supposing/imagine, If + was/were to, If + will/would) publicat: 2019-03-10T11:22:30+03:00, actualizat: 2019-03-10T11:22:30+03:00 by Colegiu.info