Present perfect simple, Present perfect continuous

Present perfect simple

We use the present perfect simple:

To talk about states, single or repeated actions over a long period of time up to the present

(often with ever/never, often/always)

I’ve always wanted to be an actor.
Have you ever been to Australia?
I’ve only used my mobile phone once since I bought it.
She’s read that book at least ten times.
– That’s the first time I’ve ever eaten octopus.
– It’s the worst concert I’ve ever been to.

To talk about recent single actions with a present result

(often with just, already, yet)

I’ve already seen that film and I don’t want to see it again.
Have you finished your essay yet?
Our friends have just arrived.

To talk about an unfinished period of time up to the present

(often with for/since, this week/month/year)

Tomoko has lived in England for five years.
I’ve been in love with Stella since 2002.
I’ve loved travelling all my life.
I’ve disliked bananas since I was a child.
We haven’t had a holiday this year.

Present perfect simple, Present perfect continuous

Present perfect continuous

We use the present perfect continuous:

To talk about a recent activity when the effects if that activity can still be seen

– Why are you out of breath?
I’ve been running.

To emphasise how long an action has been going on for, or that is has been repeated many times

I’ve been replaying to emails all morning.
I’ve been cleaning the house all day.

To suggest that an activity is temporary

I’ve been living here for five years but I’m going to move soon.

To suggest that an action is not complete

I’ve been reading War and Peace, but I haven’t finished it yet.

Watch out! We don’t use verbs that refer to a state (e.g. be, know, love) in the continuous form.


Present perfect simple, Present perfect continuous publicat: 2022-09-27T10:44:55+03:00, actualizat: 2022-09-27T11:28:49+03:00 by Colegiu.info